Katrina Foley

CA construction workers back Katrina Foley for Senate

In another indication of her wide-spread support from working people, Costa Mesa Mayor Katrina Foley garnered a powerful endorsement from the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California in her quest to represent District 37 in the State Senate.

In a statement released following the announced endorsement, Cesar Diaz, Legislative and Political Director of the State Building and Construction Trades Council, remarked:

“The State Building Trades is proud to endorse Mayor Katrina Foley for State Senate. She stands in solidarity with the hard working men and women of the Building Trades Unions – fighting for the working class, livable wages, retirement security and affordable healthcare. Mayor Foley will continue to fight for economic and social justice for the working families of Senate District 37 and throughout California.”

Recently, Foley’s campaign announced that it had topped $246,000 raised for the upcoming March primary election, significantly more than the $163,803 raised by incumbent Senator John Moorlach. The substantial haul was comprised of 472 total unique contributions in four months, with 76% donors living in the district, in addition to 64% of the donors being women.

Since entering the race for State Senate District 37, Costa Mesa Mayor Katrina Foley has built up a far-reaching coalition of support from local, state and federal leaders, organizations that represent women, classroom teachers, working families and more.

Her latest list of endorsements includes the following leaders and groups:


Organizations: 

  • State Building and Construction Trades Council of California
  • Los Angeles/Orange County Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Women In Leadership (WIL)
  • Fund Her
  • Women’s Political Committee (WPC)
  • California State Council of Laborers (LiUNA)
  • Laborers (LiUNA) Local 652
  • Laborers (LiUNA) Local 300
  • United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 324
  • Newport-Mesa Federation of Teachers 1794 COPE
  • Iron Workers Local 433
  • Iron Workers Local 416
  • Teamsters Joint Council 42
  • International Union of Painters and Allied Trades District Council 36
  • International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Local 12
  • United Association (UA) Local 582 Plumbers and Steamfitters
  • United Association (UA) Local 250 Refrigeration Fitters and Steamfitters
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 47
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 441
  • Amalgamated Transit Unit (ATU) Local 1277
  • Plasterers’ Local 200
  • SMART Sheet Metal Workers Local 105
  • Communications Workers of America (CWA) Local 9510
  • Consumer Attorneys of California (CAOC)

Elected & City Leaders:

  • U.S. Congressman Harley Rouda
  • U.S. Congresswoman Linda Sanchez
  • State Senator and Chair of the California Legislative Women’s Caucus, Connie Leyva
  • State Assemblymember Cottie Petrie-Norris
  • State Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva
  • Costa Mesa Mayor Libby Cowan (Ret.)
  • Costa Mesa Mayor Linda Dixon (Ret.)
  • Huntington Beach Mayor Debbie Cook (Ret.)
  • Huntington Beach City Mayor Keith Bohr (Ret.)
  • Laguna Beach Mayor Paul Freeman (Ret.)
  • Costa Mesa Mayor Pro Tem John Stephens
  • Anaheim City Councilmember and former Anaheim Union High School District Trustee Jordan Brandman
  • Costa Mesa City Councilmember Arlis Reynolds
  • Costa Mesa City Councilmember Manuel Chavez
  • Costa Mesa City Councilmember Andrea Marr
  • Huntington Beach City Councilmember Jill Hardy
  • Huntington Beach City Councilmember Kim Carr
  • Huntington Beach City Councilmember Connie Boardman (Ret.)
  • Huntington Beach City Councilmember Joe Shaw (Ret.)  
  • Ocean View School District Board of Trustees Vice President Gina Clayton-Tarvin
  • Irvine Mayor Beth Krom (Ret.)
  • Irvine City Councilmember Melissa Fox
  • Irvine Community Services Commission Chair Lauren Johnson-Norris
  • Laguna Beach City Councilmember Sue Kempf
  • Laguna Beach City Councilmember Peter Blake
  • Anaheim Community Services Board Commissioner Ashleigh E. Aitken
  • Costa Mesa Planning Commissioner Jeff Harlan*
  • Costa Mesa Planning Commissioner Carla Navarro Woods *
  • Costa Mesa Parks Commission Chair Liz McNabb*
  • Costa Mesa Parks Commissioner Leah Ersoylu*
  • Costa Mesa Parks Commissioner, Boardmember Democrats of Greater Irvine Cassius Rutherford*
  • Coast Community College District Board of Trustees’ President Lorraine Prinsky, Ph.D.
  • Coast Community College District Board of Trustees’ Vice President Jerry Patterson, also former U.S. Congressman and past Mayor of Santa Ana
  • Coast Community College District Board of Trustees’ Clerk Jim Moreno
  • Coast Community College District Board of Trustees’ Member Mary Hornbuckle, also former Costa Mesa Mayor

Community Leaders:

  • South Orange County Labor Chair, Raymond Cordova*
  • Democratic Foundation of Orange County Chair, Dan Jacobson*
  • Democratic Foundation of Orange County Vice Chair, Michael Penn*
  • California State University Fullerton (CSUF) Professor Dr. Scott Spitzer 
  • Dr. Marc Lerner
  • Rabbi Marcia Tilchin
  • Olive Tree Initiative’s Susan Seely*
  • Dennis Ashendorf, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Sandy Asper, Retired Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Cynthia Blackwell, Retired Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Rene Caballero, Teacher – San Bernardino
  • Staci Chapman, Teacher – Preschool
  • Julia Clevenger, Administrator – Orange Coast College 
  • Carol Crane, Retired Teacher
  • Lori Dauncey, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Kristina Dorian, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Britt Dowdy, President – Newport Mesa Federation of Teachers
  • Shelly Faulstick, Child Care Provider – Costa Mesa
  • Mary Ferryman, Retired Elementary School Teacher – Costa Mesa
  • Dena Fisher, Former Dietician – University of California Irvine 
  • Joel Flores, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Suzanne Gauntlett, Former PTA President – Newport Mesa
  • William Harador, Retired Teacher – Tustin
  • Kathy Liotta, Special Education Teaching Assistant – Newport Mesa
  • Lisa Locke, Retired Teacher Orange County Department of Education
  • Flo Martin, Retired Teacher 
  • Susan Meyer, Newport Mesa Unified School District Personnel Commission Member & Former Labor Relations Representative – CSEA* 
  • Iona Pally, Early Childhood Educator – Irvine 
  • Daniel Patterson, Former Assistant Principal at Corona Del Mar High School, Education Advocate
  • Jesi Pearce, Special Education Teaching Assistant
  • Art Perry, High School Coach – Costa Mesa
  • Kirby Piazza, Arts Educator
  • Gay Royer, Retired Librarian
  • Susan Seely, Olive Tree – University of California Irvine
  • Kelly Siegel, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Laurie Smith, Retired Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Jennifer Solano, Special Education Coordinator – Tustin
  • Richard Stein, Arts Educator
  • Casey Swanson, Teacher – Orange County
  • Dr. James Swanson, Retired Pediatric Psychiatry Professor – University of California Irvine
  • Tracy Taber, Arts Educator
  • Andy Thorburn, Educator – Villa Park
  • Patricia Villalpando, Teaching Assistant
  • Terri Webster, Teacher – Waldorf School
  • Jane Werner, Retired Teacher
  • Kelly Wolf, Teacher – Westminster
  • Sarah Yagerlener, Teacher – Newport Mesa
  • Ellie Young, Former High School Coach – Irvine
In 2018, Foley ran a successful citywide campaign in Costa Mesa – which represents 10.1% of voters in the 37th Senate District – garnering a substantial 59.5% of the citywide vote. Helping propel her triumph is the fact that for the first time in its 60-year history, Costa Mesa’s voter registration numbers now show more registered Democrats than any other political party within the city. Significantly in 2016, Hillary Clinton defeated Donald Trump by 6-points in SD-37, winning 50% to 44%, and Governor Gavin Newsom won the District in 2018, which underscores the ripe opportunity to flip this Senate seat red-to-blue. 

Katrina Foley is a community leader, successful businesswoman, working mom and attorney who became Costa Mesa’s first directly elected Mayor in November 2018. Foley also served as Mayor in 2016-2017, and has been on the Costa Mesa City Council for 10 years. Previously, she served on the Newport Mesa Unified School District Board of Trustees from November 2010 to November 2014. 

*Titles for Identification Purposes Only.

This article was released by Foley for Senate 2020.

Editor’s Note: For more information on Orange County Elected Officials, visit our Orange County Elected Officials page!

1 Comment

  1. Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States …

    https://www.ed.gov/…/speeches/secretary-devos-delivers-remarks-87th-ann…
    Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting.

    JANUARY 24, 2019

    Contact: Press Office, (202) 401-1576, [email protected]://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/secretary-devos-delivers-remarks-87th-annual-united-states-conference-mayors-winter-meeting

    DONALD TRUMP SIGNS FIRST MAJOR EDUCATION POLICY OF HIS PRESIDENCY !!

    TO WHO IT MY CONCERN:

    The new Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act Perkins V law includes several changes and additions relevant for educators, postsecondary institutions, employers, workforce development boards, community-based organizations, and others who serve historically underserved students in both secondary and postsecondary education. https://all4ed.org/perkins/

    On July 31, 2018, the President signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act into law. This bill reauthorizes the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins) and will be referred to as Perkins V. https://www.careertech.org/perkins

    In a watershed moment for his administration on education policy, President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, the first legislation Trump’s signed that makes significant changes to federal education law itself.

    The legislation is a reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, a $1.2 billion program last overhauled by Congress in 2006. The new law allows states to set their own goals for career and technical education programs without the education secretary’s approval, requires them to make progress toward those goals, and makes other changes to federal CTE law.

    Trump celebrated the bill signing at a “Pledge to America’s Workers” event on Tuesday in Florida designed to showcase the administration’s focus on workforce development.

    Accountability Systems for CTE

    Under Perkins V, states have greater flexibility to set performance levels in their accountability systems for CTE programs. But the law requires states to prioritize the performance of historically underserved students in those systems. Download the Fact sheet

    https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/07/31/donald-trump-signs-career-technical-education-bill.html

    “As mayors, this year you have a critical role in helping your state shape its Perkins plan. For the first time, the law urges you and other local leaders to regularly evaluate student needs and how programs are meeting those needs.” https://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/secretary-devos-delivers-remarks-87th-annual-united-states-conference-mayors-winter-meeting

    Perkins Career and Technical Education Primer: What’s New In Accountability?

    Alliance for Excellent Education

    40 views2 months ago

    In summer 2018, Congress passed and President Trump signed The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st …

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQHvhnh6z2k

    The new Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act Perkins V law includes several changes and additions relevant for educators, postsecondary institutions, employers, workforce development boards, community-based organizations, and others who serve historically underserved students in both secondary and postsecondary education. https://all4ed.org/perkins/

    On July 31, 2018, the President signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act into law. This bill reauthorizes the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins) and will be referred to as Perkins V. https://www.careertech.org/perkins

    In a watershed moment for his administration on education policy, President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, the first legislation Trump’s signed that makes significant changes to federal education law itself.

    The legislation is a reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, a $1.2 billion program last overhauled by Congress in 2006. The new law allows states to set their own goals for career and technical education programs without the education secretary’s approval, requires them to make progress toward those goals, and makes other changes to federal CTE law.

    Trump celebrated the bill signing at a “Pledge to America’s Workers” event on Tuesday in Florida designed to showcase the administration’s focus on workforce development. STARTS 07-01-19.

    Accountability Systems for CTE

    Under Perkins V, states have greater flexibility to set performance levels in their accountability systems for CTE programs. But the law requires states to prioritize the performance of historically underserved students in those systems. Download the Fact sheet

    https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/07/31/donald-trump-signs-career-technical-education-bill.html

    “As mayors, this year you have a critical role in helping your state shape its Perkins plan. For the first time, the law urges you and other local leaders to regularly evaluate student needs and how programs are meeting those needs.” https://www.ed.gov/news/speeches/secretary-devos-delivers-remarks-87th-annual-united-states-conference-mayors-winter-meeting

    Perkins Career and Technical Education Primer: What’s New In Accountability?

    Alliance for Excellent Education

    In summer 2018, Congress passed and President Trump signed The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st …

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQHvhnh6z2k

    Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting

    JANUARY 24, 2019

    Contact: Press Office, (202) 401-1576, [email protected]·

    Thank you, Mayor Steve Benjamin, for that kind introduction.

    It’s good to be back with some of you, and to meet so many more. I was active in local politics and policy for many years, so I know first-hand your leadership role is important to your communities and the people you serve.

    I’ve always believed solutions are best developed by those closest to an issue – by states, by communities, and by families. And mayors have a unique role in those ecosystems.

    In my current job, I naturally think a lot about all things education. Education is perhaps the most local issue there is. It starts with the family. And yet those closest to their own children and to local schools and teachers seem to be the least empowered. Yet parents know that they need different solutions for their different children. They know we need to rethink education.

    We live in some of the most exciting and opportunity-filled times ever. Over the past 100 years, we’ve seen significant advances in technology, medicine, and travel – just to name a few. But through all these changes in our homes, in our workplaces, and in our communities, approaches to education have largely remained the same for too many American students.

    Yet, right now, there are over seven million unfilled jobs in the United States. Last year when I was with some of you, there were six million. The demand for skilled workers has grown. And looking ahead, consider the reality that the majority of the jobs that today’s students will do just 10 short years from now haven’t been invented.

    Despite a booming economy with record-low unemployment, employer after employer reports that they cannot find enough qualified people to hire. I’m sure you’ve heard the same. There is a disconnect between education and the economy, just as there is often a disconnect between a child and the school they’re assigned to.

    Too many students are unprepared for successful careers today, and beyond. And too many are treated more like commodities instead of as the individuals they are, each with unique abilities and aspirations.

    As mayors, you have an important opportunity to build relationships between employers and educators. Today giant silos exist between educators and employers, between students and success. But students are better prepared for what comes next when their teachers learn from and partner with their community’s builders and doers.

    In that vein, I was pleased this administration and Congress came together to pass what we call “Perkins V.” This new law is good news for those who want to break down those silos.

    It gives states, districts, and community colleges more freedom to decide how to use taxpayer dollars to prepare students for success.

    And as mayors, this year you have a critical role in helping your state shape its Perkins plan. For the first time, the law urges you and other local leaders to regularly evaluate student needs and how programs are meeting those needs.

    Most of you likely work with your community’s economic development team. And most of you probably know the business leaders in your community well. And you certainly know your communities better than anyone in this town. You know what kinds of people are needed for the new businesses that are opening or expanding in your city. And you probably know a few folks who, with additional education, could thrive in some of those jobs.

    You all want your communities to grow and prosper. So you must play the important role of bringing together education and industry. That demands a “rethink.”

    And I’ve talked a lot about that lately. Some ask why that’s necessary. Well, education is the least disrupted “industry” in America. And, let’s not kid ourselves, it is an industry. The one-size-fits-all approach is a mismatch for too many kids. Every student is different and therefore learns differently. And education is too siloed. “Pre-K,” “K-12,” “CTE,” “community college,” “higher ed,” etcetera. The rest of the world, we know, is not siloed.

    So, by “rethink,” I mean this: everyone question everything to ensure nothing limits students from being prepared for what comes next.

    Who is “everyone”? Everyone is everyone. Students themselves. Students of every age. Parents. Grandparents. Educators. Faith leaders. Administrators. Business leaders. Servicemen and women. Community leaders. Workers of every kind. Elected officials. Everyone.

    And what is “everything”? Everything is everything. Where, when, how, what, and why we do things today – and everything about what we could or should do differently.

    Here are a few questions to consider today, and I hope you pose them to your own communities when you get home.

    Why limit educators?
    Why assign kids to schools based on their address?
    Why group kids by age?
    Why force all students to learn at the same speed?
    Why measure learning by hours and days?
    Why suggest a college degree is the only path to future success?
    Why believe education stops at graduation?

    When it comes to rethinking career and technical education, I urge you to begin by asking why CTE is siloed as “career and technical education” and not just considered “education.” By that, I mean CTE is not a destination nor is it a consolation prize. Career and technical education is as valid and important as other pursuits of study in a student’s lifelong learning journey.

    That notion is widely embraced elsewhere in the world. I recently visited a number of enterprises in Switzerland that educate and employ apprentices. And I continue to be inspired by the fact that more than two-thirds of high school students there pursue their learning through apprenticeships. As a person who herself thrives on hands-on or experiential learning, I would have loved those opportunities when I was in formal education.

    One important lesson from Switzerland is that business and community leaders don’t ask for approval from government to partner with educators. They identify needs and proactively take steps to address the needs of their communities and their lifelong learners.

    You don’t need a permission slip, either. And many communities are already figuring this out. Let me share a couple of examples.

    Penta Career Center in Perrysburg, Ohio. The name for the Center comes from the five different counties and 16 districts it partners with to prepare students for regional business needs. Students can graduate with a high school diploma and several certificates in a wide-variety of work-based learning opportunities.

    They aren’t limited by location or building – they are given the freedom to grow, explore, and learn in ways that work for them.

    I think also of dual-enrollment efforts, like the one at Lorenzo Walker Tech, in Naples, Florida. Students there can earn a high school diploma and an associate’s degree simultaneously through partnership with Florida Southwestern State College. A great head-start toward successful careers.

    At Harper College outside Chicago, I was impressed by the non-traditional apprenticeships, like ones in banking, insurance, and supply-chain management. These kinds of apprenticeships are common in other parts of the world, but aren’t yet here. They need to be.

    Then there’s Mercedes and BFGoodrich which partner with Shelton State Community College in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to offer students excellent opportunities to upskill in their current profession or start a new one. Employers and educators working hand-in-hand to develop stronger community – in every sense of the word.

    These examples are encouraging. Students need more of them. Many more! Employers need them, as do educators. Most importantly, your communities need them.

    Ultimately, we must expand our thinking about what education actually is, as well as resist the urge to expect all students to follow the same track. Many of you may have seen Congresswoman Virginia Foxx’s piece in The Wall Street Journal last month. “By placing descriptors like ‘vocational’ and ‘technical’ in front of the word ‘education,’” Congresswoman Foxx wrote, “we generate misleading thoughts” about education.

    Perhaps the most misleading descriptor, Congresswoman Foxx wrote – and I agree – is “training.” Animals are trained. People pursue education.

    So, there should be many education pathways because there are many types of students with many different interests and many kinds of opportunities with varying requirements.

    And we can’t kid ourselves to think we’re supporting multiple pathways if the road to a traditional 4-year-college degree is paved… and other legitimate education opportunities are rutted gravel roads.

    Careers are like highways, after all, not one-way or dead-end streets. Highways have off-ramps and on-ramps. Students should be able to exit easily for a time to learn something new, then re-enter the highway at an on-ramp of their choosing, and then change lanes as needed.

    I know it’s easy to get lost in papers, programs, and plans. But let’s not lose sight of why we are here.

    I recently met a young woman from Minneapolis named Isabel. Isabel apprenticed at a company called Bühler while she earned her high school diploma, and got paid for it. She worked with engineers and experienced a variety of jobs within Bühler. Isabel’s apprenticeship launched her on an early trajectory to success. At age 21, Isabel owns her own home, owns her own car, has her own health care policy and 401K, and she recently earned a job offer to move and work in Switzerland.

    We owe students who today don’t have opportunities like Isabel’s to rethink education, to aim as high as students do, and to be bold for their future – and ours.

    Let’s keep all students at the center of every conversation and everything we do.

    Thank you for everything you do to serve your communities.

    Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States …
    https://www.ed.gov/…/speeches/secretary-devos-delivers-remarks-87th-annual-united-…

    Secretary DeVos delivers remarks at 87th annual United States Conference of Mayors Winter Meeting. Thank you, Mayor Steve Benjamin, for that kind introduction. It’s good to be back with some of you, and to meet so many more.

    CWA Today is hosted by Bob Lanter, Executive Director at California Workforce Association and features interviews with experts on key workforce issues, both regionally and nationally, as well as workforce news and updates.

    CWA Today addresses the workforce topics and issues that are important to you, the workforce professional. Episodes can be downloaded on a plethora of additional listening platforms; iTunes, Google Play, iHeart Radio, Sticher Radio or direct on Libsyn.com or scroll down to play our YouTube episodes.

    CWA Today Wants To Hear From You!

    Bob wants to hear from you, the listener. What workforce guests, innovations, or issues do you want to hear about next? Email: [email protected] and let him know, and he will address that topic in a future episode. https://calworkforce.org/cwa-today-podcast/

    E13: Career Tech Education in California- Trends and Opportunities

    Orange County, California – OC Development Board
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    https://blog.ed.gov/2018/08/

    The Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century (Perkins V) Act was signed into law this week and brings changes to the $1.2 billion annual federal investment in career and technical education (CTE). The U.S. Department of Education is looking forward to working with states to implement the new legislation which goes into effect on July 1, 2019 and replaces the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education (Perkins IV) Act of 2006.

    “The law creates new opportunities to improve CTE and enables more flexibility for states to meet the unique needs of their learners, educators, and employers,” said Scott Stump, Assistant Secretary for Career, Technical, and Adult Education.

    Perkins V removes the Department from negotiating state performance levels for student academic attainment and other outcomes, leaving it to states and their stakeholders to determine their performance goals.

    Perkins V also updates and expands the definition of “special populations” to include homeless individuals, foster youth, and those who have aged out of the foster care system, and youth with a parent who is on active duty in the armed forces. The new law also increases the amount states may spend on students in state correctional systems, and increases the amount states may set aside in a “special reserve” fund to focus on rural areas, areas with high numbers or concentrations of CTE programs, or areas with gaps or disparities in performance.

    THANK YOU

    CRAIG A. DURFEY

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