City logo courtesy of Garden Grove

Garden Grove partners with Black Dog Gaming to host Esports Fast Pitch event February 28

Taking its first big footstep into the billion-dollar gaming industry, the City of Garden Grove will cosponsor an Esports Fast Pitch, Conference and Tournament! event with Black Dog Gaming on Friday, February 28, from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., in the Garden Grove Community Meeting Center, located at 11300 Stanford Avenue.

Esports Fast Pitch, Conference and Tournament! is an opportunity to connect and network with leading e-gaming executives, investors, influencers, celebrities and other fellow gamers, as well as pitch e-sport or video game concepts.
A panel of industry leaders will discuss current and future trends and investment opportunities in the market. Speakers include Founder and CEO of Black Dog Venture Partners/Black Dog Gaming Scott Kelly; founding member of the rap group N.W.A and Black Dog Gaming partner Arabian Prince; General Manager and CEO of WorldGaming and Collegiate StarLeague Wim Stocks; and angel investor Jeff Wang.

Other e-gaming presenters and vendor companies include Advrtas, Dun Rite Games, Megafans and Infamy Fantasy Esports.
General tickets are $69 per person and include event admission, and participation in demos and panel discussions.

VIP tickets are $299 per person and include event admission, catered lunch, and an invitation to a VIP after-party with investors and panelists.

To register, visit http://bit.ly/esports-fast-pitch-tickets.

In keeping with the City’s Reimagine Garden Grove efforts, the Office of Economic Development is focused on partnering with tech-leaders and businesses to promote e-gaming in the community that will build regional and international interest and investment.

This article was released by the City of Garden Grove.

1 Comment

  1. THE DANGER OF SOCIAL MEDIA WITHOUT MEASURING THE HARM TO ONE HEALTH RISK IS A FORM OF MODERN CHILD ABUSE TO OUR CHILDREN SAFETY.BELOW ARE LINKS WITH A CITY PARTNERING WITHOUT DUE CAUTION WHICH CAN LEAD TO MORE YOUTH SUICIDES.
    Video games are practically a national pastime, but mental health experts see cause for alarm
    “President John F. Kennedy said technology ‘has no conscience of its own. Whether it will become a force for good or ill depends on man.’ Yet swayed by digital-age myths, we are providing our children with remarkably little guidance on their use of technology.”

    02-07-2020
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/esports-fast-pitch-conference-and-tournament-tickets-79345214673
    https://enewspaper.latimes.com/desktop/latimes/default.aspx?edid=7da07e31-beeb-42c1-8764-120c5201604a

    South Korea wrestles with inability to unplug
    Video games are practically a national pastime, but mental health experts see cause for alarm
    https://www.amazon.com/Glow-Kids-Screen-Addiction-Hijacking-

    02-07-2020
    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/esports-fast-pitch-conference-and-tournament-tickets-79345214673
    https://enewspaper.latimes.com/desktop/latimes/default.aspx?edid=7da07e31-beeb-42c1-8764-120c5201604a

    South Korea wrestles with inability to unplug
    Video games are practically a national pastime, but mental health experts see cause for alarm
    https://www.amazon.com/Glow-Kids-Screen-Addiction-Hijacking-
    SEOUL — His video game habit started in middle school.
    SEOUL — His video game habit started in middle school.
    His bedroom door was always locked, and when his grandmother stood on the veranda and peered through his window, he was invariably engrossed in an on-screen gunfight.
    He eventually began disappearing to play at internet cafes. Night after night, she would search for him, and he would try to evade her.
    Now he is 21 and unemployed. In June at his grandfather’s funeral, he played games on his phone.
    “There wasn’t a day he’d go without playing,” said his grandmother, who raised him and felt so ashamed by his situation that she would speak only on condition that her family not be named. “Games ruined the child.”
    That’s a controversial opinion in South Korea these days.
    Video games are practically the national pastime, played by the majority of adults and more than 90% of adolescents. Rising concerns over the effects of games on mental health have been met with skepticism and disdain by the $13-billion gaming industry.
    The debate intensified in May after the World Health Organization officially added “internet gaming disorder” to the 2022 edition of its International Classification of Diseases, which sets global standards for diagnosis.
    That was a welcome development to many of South Korea’s mental health professionals, who say the classification will broaden understanding of the problem and improve treatment.
    They point to multiple incidents of gamers dying after playing for days with little food or sleep. In 2009, a couple became so consumed by games that they allowed their infant daughter to die of malnutrition — landing them in prison for negligent homicide.
    The South Korean government, which has assembled a panel of experts and industry insiders to study the issue, could add gaming disorder to its own diagnostic Korean Standard Classification of Diseases as soon as 2025.
    The country’s gaming industry argues that the classification will have dire economic consequences.
    Only the United States, China and Japan have bigger gaming sectors than South Korea, which exported $6 billion in games in 2017 — more than 10 times what the country’s K-pop music industry brought in.
    “It’ll be a disaster,” said Kim Jung-tae, a professor of game studies at Dongyang University and a veteran game developer who signed onto a task force pledging to fight the disease classification. “The entire ecosystem of the game industry could collapse.”
    He called the push to recognize problematic gaming as an addiction a “witch hunt” perpetrated by psychiatrists and bureaucrats who stand to profit from funding for research and treatment as well as parents eager to explain away their children’s academic failures.
    He said he worried that increased regulation would spur gaming companies to move their operations overseas.

    PLEASE CLICK ON THE LINK ABOVE TO READ THE FULL STORY
    South Korea wrestles with inability to unplug
    Video games are practically a national pastime, but mental health experts see cause for alarm
    GAMERS AT an esports cafe in Seoul. Concerns over video games’ effects have led South Korea to consider listing “gaming disorder” as a disease. (Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images)
    By Victoria Kim
    SEOUL — His video game habit started in middle school.
    His bedroom door was always locked, and when his grandmother stood on the veranda and peered through his window, he was invariably engrossed in an on-screen gunfight.
    He eventually began disappearing to play at internet cafes. Night after night, she would search for him, and he would try to evade her.
    Now he is 21 and unemployed. In June at his grandfather’s funeral, he played games on his phone.
    “There wasn’t a day he’d go without playing,” said his grandmother, who raised him and felt so ashamed by his situation that she would speak only on condition that her family not be named. “Games ruined the child.”
    That’s a controversial opinion in South Korea these days.
    Video games are practically the national pastime, played by the majority of adults and more than 90% of adolescents. Rising concerns over the effects of games on mental health have been met with skepticism and disdain by the $13-billion gaming industry.
    The debate intensified in May after the World Health Organization officially added “internet gaming disorder” to the 2022 edition of its International Classification of Diseases, which sets global standards for diagnosis.
    That was a welcome development to many of South Korea’s mental health professionals, who say the classification will broaden understanding of the problem and improve treatment.
    They point to multiple incidents of gamers dying after playing for days with little food or sleep. In 2009, a couple became so consumed by games that they allowed their infant daughter to die of malnutrition — landing them in prison for negligent homicide.
    The South Korean government, which has assembled a panel of experts and industry insiders to study the issue, could add gaming disorder to its own diagnostic Korean Standard Classification of Diseases as soon as 2025.
    The country’s gaming industry argues that the classification will have dire economic consequences.
    Only the United States, China and Japan have bigger gaming sectors than South Korea, which exported $6 billion in games in 2017 — more than 10 times what the country’s K-pop music industry brought in.
    “It’ll be a disaster,” said Kim Jung-tae, a professor of game studies at Dongyang University and a veteran game developer who signed onto a task force pledging to fight the disease classification. “The entire ecosystem of the game industry could collapse.”
    He called the push to recognize problematic gaming as an addiction a “witch hunt” perpetrated by psychiatrists and bureaucrats who stand to profit from funding for research and treatment as well as parents eager to explain away their children’s academic failures.
    He said he worried that increased regulation would spur gaming companies to move their operations overseas.
    “It’s part of a phobia of new media,” he said. “Games, like air, are already a part of our lives.”
    The Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism, which is tasked with promoting and supporting the gaming industry, has estimated that the gaming disorder designation will reduce revenue by $9 billion over the next three years and cost 8,700 jobs.
    It has lobbied the World Health Organization to drop the classification and urged South Korea to reject it, putting it at odds with the health ministry.
    Mental health advocates say concerns that the industry will come crashing down are overblown.
    “Alcoholics don’t blame the company that makes the liquor,” said Roh Sung-won, an addiction specialist and professor of psychiatry at Hanyang University Hospital in Seoul. “You don’t stop manufacturing cars because there are automobile accidents.”
    Roh said one of his patients was a video game addict who was hospitalized for a month for psychiatric care, after the owner of an internet cafe got worried about him and called police. The man had been playing for 72 hours straight.
    News
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