Action Points from Pastor Kerry: God’s unique path towards reconciliation

In our worship gatherings on Sunday, we kicked off our new series “I AM: Facing Uncertain times with an ever-present God”. We’d love to have you join us for this great exploration into the identity of God…a God who can help us weather the storms of this season by being a steadfast anchor for us to cling to!

“I AM” comes from Moses’ famous divine encounter concerning a burning bush. Before this would take place, Moses enjoyed a posh upbringing in the royal Egyptian palace as an adopted Hebrew son. His lavish luxuries kept him distracted for years, but later, after growing up, Moses decided to see the Hebrew workforce for himself.

Exodus 2:11-12 NLT “Many years later, when Moses had grown up, he went out to visit his own people, the Hebrews, and he saw how hard they were forced to work. During his visit, he saw an Egyptian beating one of his fellow Hebrews. After looking in all directions to make sure no one was watching, Moses killed the Egyptian and hid the body in the sand.”

Moses was suddenly confronted with reality: his people were enslaved, brutally oppressed for the purpose of building up the ruling elite of ancient Egypt. Overcome with the injustice of it all, Moses took matters into his own hands. He gave an Egyptian slave-master a taste of his own violent medicine. However, Moses soon learned the results of his efforts to “fight fire with fire”…

Exodus 2:15 NLT “When Pharaoh heard of it, he sought to kill Moses. But Moses fled from Pharaoh and stayed in the land of Midian…”

Suddenly, this royal elite found himself accused as a treasonous enemy of the state. So he fled for his life. Years later, in Exodus 3, Moses is no longer lounging in palaces…but weathered, working all day, with smelly livestock. His rash revenge to right a wrong has cost him everything: his status and power are utterly gone. However, we discover God is with Him. “I AM” encourages Moses: his desire to stop oppression and help others wasn’t wrong…Moses just needed to join God, follow His lead, and use His methods.

Exodus 3:9-10 NLT “Look! The cry of the people of Israel has reached me, and I have seen how harshly the Egyptians abuse them. Now go, for I am sending you to Pharaoh. You must lead my people Israel out of Egypt.”

God gave Moses a second chance to help his people, to combat injustice. And, as history unfolded, God’s promise came true. The same God who empowered Moses to rescue His oppressed people is the God we serve today. He is ready to empower you to right wrongs and help others too, by means of His love and His methods.

Check out the 5 action points we explored on Sunday, listed here:
i. Pray (1st Thessalonians 5:17, James 5:16)
ii. Point people to Jesus: with your words (Acts 1:8) and your actions (John 13:34)
iii. Learn from and Listen to others (Proverbs 1:5)
iv. Speak up for others (Proverbs 31:8)
v. Step up for others (Luke 12:48)

Take a moment to meet with God over this. Remove distractions, sit still, and listen for His voice. Thank God for how open and accessible He is. Then, consider these 5 action points (above) together with Him. Which of these might God be calling you to step into this week? What unique venues, relationships, or circumstances has God placed you in, places where you could make a difference for God’s Kingdom? Pray for courage and try putting what you and God have talked about into practice!

Bible Reading Plan for the week

This week, we’re reading the back-story behind Moses’ encounter with God! These readings will help us understand the context of this pivotal main passage better. Use an easy-to-read printed Bible, or even an audio bible while you exercise or commute! (or explore other Bible reading plans). Enjoy!

  1. Monday, June 8 Exodus 1:1-22
  2. Tuesday, June 9 Exodus 2:1-15
  3. Wednesday, June 10 Exodus 2:16-25
  4. Thursday, June 11 Exodus 3:1-7
  5. Friday, June 12 Exodus 3:10-22

Explore, learn, and grow more!
Check out the great resources on our Revive webpages at neighborhoodchurch.com.

Learning alongside you,
Kerry Kaufman