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Huntington Beach native cuts stoppers from a highline aboard USS Nimitz deployed in Philippine Sea

U.S. Navy Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Travis Zenk, from Huntington Beach, Calif., cuts stoppers from a highline in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a replenishment-at-sea. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caylen McCutcheon)
U.S. Navy Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Travis Zenk, from Huntington Beach, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Caylen McCutcheon)

U.S. Navy Boatswain’s Mate 3rd Class Travis Zenk, from Huntington Beach, Calif., cuts stoppers from a highline in the hangar bay aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) during a replenishment-at-sea.

Nimitz is in 7th Fleet conducting routine operations.

7th Fleet is the U.S. Navy’s largest forward-deployed numbered fleet, and routinely interacts and operates with 35 maritime nations in preserving a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

This article was released by the Navy Office of Community Outreach.

2 Comments

  1. The deck of the hangar bay of an aircraft carrier is generally about the same elevation above the surface of the water as the main deck of most supply ships, so it makes an ideal location to anchor one end of the highline so it can be approximately ‘level’. More often than not, with carriers, it’s equipment that comes across on the highline, but it can be used for personnel as well. Many supply ships are equipped with helicopters and that’s the preferred way for personnel transport.

  2. Can an OC Breeze reader that may have served in the US Navy enlighten the readers about what is hanging on a highline in the hangar bay? People or equipment? I can imagine a hiker in the jungle using a highline to cross a river filled with gators and piranhas.

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